Announcing the Official Launch of “Tu Tulum”

Tulum Raiders, Inc. proudly announces the launch of “Tu Tulum,” a community resource map and planning tool for everyone!

Follow this link for the full site:

         http://www.yohman.com/students/2012/lglancy/Tulum/TulumHome_0612.html

Project:

Tu Tulum is a neighborhood resource map for the citizens of the town of Tulum. It is a one-stop resource where community members can find out what public resources are available to them, and where. It is also a forum where the townspeople can express their opinion and make suggestions to their civic leaders about improvements that can be made, which assets they value and which deficits they would like improved in their community.

The website maps out a variety of parks, bike rack locations, civic offices, and other points of interest, and includes info windows and photos about the location. These community resources are toggled by category, so viewers can turn them on or off at their viewing convenience. Tulum is divided into “colonias” or neighborhoods. These colonias are also mapped in a toggled layer, allowing residents to see which colonia they belong to. In order to connect residents with happenings in the community, a Twitter widget streaming Tulum-related tweets is also featured on the site. This allows community organizers to reach a wider, but Tulum- centered audience when tweeting about events happening in the city.

Why does this matter?

Tulum is a rapidly emerging Caribbean coastal town in Quintana Roo, Mexico. The neighboring global tourism destinations of Cancun and Playa del Carmen are a threat to Tulum’s future, bringing upon it rapid and unmitigated growth. The 18,000 citizens of Tulum are a diverse group of Mayans, Mexicans from other states and international small business‬ owners. These citizens share a common goal: to preserve Tulum’s culture and ecosystems.

With unprecedented growth on the horizon, the Municipality of Tulum hired the Tulum Raiders, to create a civic engagement tool to help their citizens to shape the future of their communities. Tu Tulum means Your Tulum. The neighborhood portal we’ve created is a tool to give the people of Tulum a forum in which to share their visions.

Purpose of our website:

The Tulum Neighborhood Portal has two functions:

1) A one-stop neighborhood resource map for the citizens of the city of Tulum.

2) A tool for the citizens to participate in city planning by identifying places they like or that need improvement. Citizens can also suggests resources needed in the community.

Main functions:

1) Community resources: toggled by category, so viewers can turn them on or off at their viewing convenience.

2) Red/Green/Magic Wand: users can directly click the map to add three types of markers to “evaluate” their neighborhoods.

Red: Indicates an unsatisfactory area or asset that needs attention

Green: Indicates a positive asset in the community

Magic Wand: Indicates a non-existing, but desired asset

3) Twitter Widget: it does a live search and streams Tulum-related tweets. Citizens/public officials can advertise community events or announcements by including “Tulum” in their tweets to be listed in the widget. This allows them to reach Tulum- centered audience when tweeting about events happening in the city.

4) Picasa API: retrieve photos from Picasa album and show photos in slideshows. Pictures will be shown in the box below the title.

Wire Frames :

Wire Frame Home

 

Wire Frame Participate

Wire Frame Participate

The Team:

Lisa: The connection to the community and municipal staff of Tulum. Lisa collected local knowledge to create the first-ever documented boundaries of the communities of Tulum. She also collaborated with Tulum residents to test the site and receive feedback for continuous improvements. She worked on the Picasa API slideshow, authoring KMZ files in Google Earth and contributed general design and coding support.

Yumi: The Coder extraordinaire. Yumi was the main coder for Tu Tulum. She worked tirelessly through the coding details of the various redesign and functional changes the website underwent over time.

Paola: The official “traductora”(translator), she translated the web content for Tu Tulum. This includes the special HTML keys for accent marks, which were one of the earlier challenges. She also worked on photo editing for the Picasa slideshow, bringing in the Twitter feed, and styling of the website.

 Documentation:

User interaction using a Custom Functions

<Participate: red/green light + light bulb function>

We aim to make this website as an alternative tool to conventional community planning led by planners and professionals. Thus, user interaction is the key of our website. The function allows us to geographically map concerns and ideas the residents have on their own community.

The process of using this function is intuitive. Users click on the location they want to comment about, choose the type of the place (good, bad, idea), and make a comment. The “green light” and “red light” icons are also self-explanatory. It is easy for users to understand whether the place is seen positive or negative. The yellow light bulb icon symbolizes an idea that the user is interested in sharing with their community.

Considering the level of residents’ web familiarity, we tried to make this function’s user interface simple and easy to navigate. Input form is also kept simple (location, type, and comment) so that users would not be discouraged to give comments. Finally, the anonymity of the comments invites users to post any comments without the risk of repercussions that may be related to politics or other tensions in the community.

The photo slideshow streaming in photos from the Picasa API is an additional feature of Tu Tulum. Eventually, if users would like to contribute photos to the photo banner, they can directly be uploaded to a public Picasa album, which will automatically add them to the slideshow.

Custom Layers

The neighborhoods of Tulum were nothing more than unofficial borders known to some residents of Tulum by word of mouth. The Tulum Raiders employed AutoCad files provided by the municipality of Tulum to author KMZ files of the neighborhoods. This layer was then toggled by neighborhood, and one “all neighborhoods” toggle box to allow users to see what neighborhood they belong to, as well as the names and boundaries.

A Google places layer was also included in the website, highlighting the relevant community resources. These points include an info window containing a photo and description of the location.  The homepage also features a legend for the user to locate these points easily.

 Evaluation:

  • What worked: narrowing down the focus of the website, using sharp design, specifying the geography in twitter widget to eliminate Turkish bag pipe tweets.
  • What did not: Spanish accents (we did fixed the problem in the end).
  • What would you do if you had more time: upgrading the user interface (making side bars on the right and changing to a more minimalist design, easier single-access to the “participate” function…etc)
  • What is the future of the project: A testing phase of the website will be implemented with the support of the Tulum Municipality. If the website is successful, then the city may choose to buy server space to host the website in the long term. The website is also a model for the sister-city project of Little Tokyo. The Tulum Raiders are interested in benefitting additional communities with modified versions of this resource in the future.

 

 

Week 10: Launching GeoStories

It’s with great pleasure that we announce the quasi-official public launch of GeoStories!

GeoStories-Home Page

GeoStories is an easy-to-use and versatile story-mapping platform that enables users to create personal narratives around the places they’ve been and the experiences they’ve had there.

The site’s simple, streamlined interface allows users to pair their personal thoughts with meaningful images or videos pulled from the media site(s) of their preference (Picasa, Flickr, YouTube, Vimeo, etc.), almost instantly transforming the ubiquitous digital map into a personal memoir, descriptive genealogy, historical non-fiction, or lighthearted travel journal.

Audience
GeoStories can be used by a broad swath of the academic and civilian population–anyone looking to connect, contextualize, and share the many remarkable moments and memories of their lives. The GeoStories site represents a small but important step in making the educational mapping tools of academia available to a larger public, and yet, can still be used in developing the kind of rich historical narratives needed for research purposes.

Team
GeoStories is a start-up funded by E.Y. Ventures and founded by Uyen Ngo and Andrew Pogany. As Chief Experience Officer, Ngo has dedicated her considerable time and expertise to the design and programming of the entire GeoStories site. She also created two instructional videos. As Senior Story Teller, Pogany has contributed to the site’s concept and content. He also created a video, and led the integration of Google Places.

Design History
The GeoStories interface began as a slightly highfalutin concept, one that sought to use an ornamental frame as the border of our central map.

GeoStories-First Interface Concept

After recognizing the limits of our time, funding and technical know-how, we simplified the interface, stripping it of any excessive aesthetic concerns and focusing primarily on functionality.

GeoSories-- Beta Story Board Interface

Feeling as if this was a solid base to build upon, we did just that: focus on adding functionality and increasing usability until whipping the GeoStories site into its present form.

GeoStories--New Story Board Interface

How It Works
You begin creating your geostory from the GeoStories Story Board. Upon entering the Story Board page, the user is greeted by a pop-up window of useful instructions.

GeoStories-- Instructional Modal

The Story Board consists of three functional tabs: Story Board, Table of Contents, and Related Places.

Each geostory is built of chapters; each chapter represents a different location; and each location can be detailed with personal thoughts and narrative text, as well as imagery or video.

As each chapter is completed, you’ll see a numbered icon representing the chapter appear in the GeoStories map display. Clicking on the icon will reveal the full, multimedia description of your experience.

Additionally, as each chapter is completed, GeoStories creates a corresponding button underneath the Table of Contents tab.

Each chapter can then be enriched by clicking the Related Places tab, which will display those Google Place categories related to the chapter’s location. These can be toggled on and off.

Once all the desired number of chapters has been written, and the user hits the Publish button, the map display zooms out to reveal all chapter icons, numbered and linked—a narrative constellation that can be explored and shared.

Likewise, the Table of Contents tab will then contain buttons for all chapters, providing an additional way of manually navigating back and forth within the geostory.

And additional navigation is provided by “Next” and “Previous” buttons within the chapter info windows.

Key Functions and Technical Documentation

1. User-Generated Map: GeoStories is ultimately a tool by which users can quickly become authors of personalized, multimedia, map-based narratives. Fundamental to this function is the use of the Google Maps API, as well as the Google geocoder, which enables a non-specific location entered in the Address input to be almost instantly translated into latlong coordinates and mapped.

2. Media Upload: Popular online media management sites such as Flickr, YouTube, Picasa, and Vimeo provide image and video links for content owned by the user or deemed available for public use. Presently, GeoStories users must copy and paste the appropriate image or video link into the Pictures/Video input on the Story Board. They also have the option of including the embed codes of images and videos in the Description input.

3. Navigation: Users can navigate through the stories they’ve created using chapter buttons in the Table of Contents or “Next” and “Previous” buttons in the chapter’s info window. Table of Content buttons were coded with the help of Bootstrap; info window buttons uses the same Modal as the Instructions Pop-Up referenced below (#5). Both the Table of contents and InfoWindow buttons allow a user to move seemlessly (and non-linearly) through the story chapters.

4. Google Places: Along with Google Maps, GeoStories utilizes the Google Places API to populate the “Related Places” tab on the Story Board page.Users can search for different places of interest related to each individual chapter and its corresponding location, thereby enriching the narrative and providing GeoStories with additional functionality that widens its potential uses.

5. Useability: User experience is of utmost importance to GeoStories. That why created several instructional videos (using iMovie), a FAQ page, and an Instructional Pop-Up that appears each time the Story Board page accessed. The Instructional Pop-up was created using code for a standard modal, a “child window” that requires users to interact with it before they can return to operating the primary application.

6. Design: The GeoStories site was programmed using HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Our design code was aided considerably by BootStrap, as well as the friendly technicians at EY Ventures.

Challenges
It’s been a sharp learning curve for this 2-person team. A lot of the brainwork/coding was from Yoh. Because of the unique nature of our website, we weren’t able to always work off what we learned in class and had to rely on the genius of Yoh/Erin/Ryan. We’re very grateful for that, but wish we had more tools ourselves to do more of the foundational work.

Future Changes

1. Social Media Connection: The next iteration of the GeoStories site will necessitate a user to sign in with either their Google, Facebook, or Twitter accounts before being able to create or open stories. This will in essence set the user up with a GeoStories account. after acquiring an account, users will be able to enter the Story Board page and create, open, or share a geostories. T

2. Saving Stories: Once an account is established, users can also store their stories. Saved stories would appear in the Library page of the GeoStories site, from which the user can choose to share(via social network), delete, or edit their stories. Establishing such a library requires advanced server-side scripting.

Public Launch

Note: The data presented here represents preliminary findings and should not be used without written permission from UCLA. This is a student draft of the data and is not to be used.

 Overview

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions by reducing electricity consumption is a priority of the state of California. In 2009, California implemented SB 375, which requires Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) to create Sustainable Community Strategies to address these goals. Our team, Take Electricity Seriously, Los Angeles (T.E.S.L.A.) is proud to announce the official public launch of an electricity consumption map for the City of Los Angeles (City) to give a more complete overview of where and how electricity is used. Normally, only utilities know how much electricity is used and where it is used. Producing this map has the potential to greatly impact energy policy in the City and eventually throughout the State. This map has a detail of data that can assist policymakers in their understanding of implications of electricity sustainability requirements and goals. Once results have been approved, we plan on this map being utilized by Los Angeles residents to clarify and illuminate where the major power consumers are in the city.

Website Development

Our website went through many iterations. One of the biggest challenges was deciding on how to simply and clearly display a lot of information and interactive options. Another design development process was picking the color scheme. Below, you can see our wireframe ideas and some of the color options we tried when we deciding on our data presentation.

First Vision/Brainstorming:

Second Idea:

Midterm Project:

Re-envisioning:

 

Final Presentation:

 

Data representation:

Option1- Too green

Option 2- Too beige

Option 1 million- Juuuuust right!

Team Members

Jacki- Technical Genius and Principal Dreamer

Hailing from Kansas City, Jacki came to UCLA’s Urban and Regional Planning program and hit the ground running! She has worked for The Institute of the Environment for three quarters and was our liaison between our client (The Institute of the Environment) and our team. Jacki’s data analysis and ESRI GIS skills were a great addition when we were figuring out how to graphically display complex information.

Kristen- Energy Super Star and Data Cruncher

A local of Southern California, Kristen grew up with an interest in Los Angeles happenings. As an undergraduate, Kristen studied residential energy consumption and feedback technologies to increase conservation. Her knowledge of ESRI GIS and electricity measures were critical to the decision-making process regarding data analysis.

Kyle- Math Extraordinaire and Voice of Reason

Kyle is a coding wizard. Kyle hails from Anaheim, California but spent his undergraduate years in New York. As a civil engineer, Kyle was a great asset in validating our methodology and processing complex levels of data. His linear thought process helped us make our dreams and visions a reality.

Zhongbo- Creative Director and Voice of the People

Zhongbo makes the world a better looking place wherever she goes! Originally from Jilin, China, Zhongbo has a degree in civil engineering and is currently concentrating in Design and Development at UCLA’s Urban and Regional Planning program. Her ability to inspire created an engaging interface that is user-friendly. Chances are, if you saw a subtly cool design element, it was her inspiration!

Evaluation of Our Website

TESLA went through several revisions and experimented with various concepts and designs in order to make the user experience friendly, yet informative. We wanted to keep the basic user interface simple and easy to comprehend since the data being displayed is complex. In order to do this we have two separate tabs for user features, the basic option is a simple search bar where the user can search for various locations within the City. This keeps the map focus on its primary function, which is to display the EAZs and allow users to click over various sections of the map. The other options are in an advanced tab where the more nuanced and informative functions are kept such as the other years, percent change, land uses, and neighborhood energy uses and boundaries.  One function that we were not able to incorporate due to unforeseen errors and search limitations was the radius summary function. This was a complicated feature that would have allowed users to see the energy use within a certain distance of their selected EAZ. Due to time constraints we were also not able to tile all of the EAZ years down to the furthest zoom level. With more resources and time we hope to be able to expand upon this website and fill in some of these gaps.

Looking forward, we will add water data and natural gas data to the map. Through further cooperation with the utility companies in Los Angeles, we hope to obtain hourly data at the parcel level. This will add a whole new level of complexity to the website and allow policy makers and utility companies to pinpoint how seasonal and peak hour changes effect the City’s electricity consumption. Eventually the scope of our project will expand to Los Angeles County, providing a more holistic look into Southern California’s energy use.

 

Our Website- Technical Requirements

The main goal of our website was to creatively and simply display a large amount of electricity data. There were over 150,000 Energy Analysis Zones (EAZs), each with numerous pieces of data attached. Our website features several interactive features. When the website loads, the user sees a map with colorful polygons throughout the City of Los Angeles. Each polygon represents and Energy Analysis Zone, which is at the Zip+4 unit of analysis. When the user clicks on a polygon, he or she opens up an infowindow that shows electricity usage over time (in kWh/year), the dominant land use of the EAZ, and the EAZ identification number. If a user clicks on a part of the map that does not have electricity data attached to it (ie- the user does not click on an EAZ), a warning infowindow notifies the user that the website does not have data collected for that region.

Showing electricity consumption throughout the City is important, but it is also valuable for users to be able to evaluate how electricity use has changed over time. Users are able to view electricity data for the years 2005-2010. Also, there is an additional feature of being able to view the average annual change in electricity consumption. When the user clicks on the “Yearly Change” radio button, the EAZs on the map change colors to reflect an increase or decrease in consumption. Also, the scale at the bottom of the page changes to reflect the new color scheme.

We included the following…

Interactive features:

  • Geocoder- Enables users to search for a specific address or place and find out several pieces of information, including what EAZ it is located in and what the EAZ’s electricity consumption is.
  • Land Use dropdown- This feature enables users to view EAZs with a specific dominant land use. These Land Use types included Commercial, Industrial, Single Family Residential, Multi-family Residential, Mixed Residential, Other, and Not Available.

Custom Functions:

  • Google Charts API- using Google Charts API, we created customized column charts to show electricity consumption over time. We displayed the data in an infowindow so that it is visible when a user clicks on an EAZ.

Layers:

  • EAZ electricity consumption by year- This is the bread and butter of our project. The electricity use by year is the default setting that loads when our website loads.
  • Average annual change- This layer shows the average annual change (%) in electricity over time. This was calculated by finding the slope of the data from 2005-2010. As more data is added, this section will be revised and updated to show a more accurate picture.
  •  Neighborhood council totals-The electricity use of each neighborhood was totaled to show users a more aggregated picture of electricity consumption in LA
  • Show Neighborhoods- For reference, users can toggle the Neighborhood Councils layer on/off to display the boundaries for neighborhoods in Los Angeles.

Week 9: GeoStories — Final Update

We are pleased to announce that GeoStories is proceeding according to (most of) our plans.


GeoStories is still all about connecting—and contextualizing—our many remarkable moments and memories. The site’s simple, streamlined interface allows users to pair their personal thoughts with meaningful images or videos pulled from the media site(s) of their preference (Picasa, Flickr, YouTube, Vimeo, etc.), almost instantly transforming the ubiquitous digital map into a personal memoir, descriptive genealogy, historical non-fiction, or lighthearted travel journal.

    How It Works

GeoStories still works the same way, except we’ve added several functions that improve navigation and user experience.

As before, you begin creating your story chapters from the GeoStories Story Board. However, you’ll notice that the Story Board is now one of three functional tabs.

Each geostory is built of chapters; each chapter represents a different location; and each location can be detailed with personal thoughts and narrative text, as well as imagery or video.

As each chapter is completed, you’ll see a numbered icon representing the chapter appear in the GeoStories map display. Clicking on the icon will reveal the full, multimedia description of your experience.

Additionally, as each chapter is completed, GeoStories creates a corresponding button underneath the Table of Contents tab.

Each chapter can then be enriched by clicking the Related Places tab, which will display those Google Place categories related to the chapter’s location. These can be toggled on and off.

Once all the desired number of chapters has been written, and the user hits the Publish button, the map display zooms out to reveal all chapter icons, numbered and linked—a narrative constellation that can be explored and shared.

Likewise, the Table of Contents tab will then contain buttons for all chapters, providing an additional way of manually navigating back and forth within the geostory.

    Key Functions

1. User-Generated Map: GeoStories is ultimately a tool by which users can quickly become authors of personalized, multimedia, map-based narratives. Fundamental to this function is the use of the Google Maps API, as well as the Google geocoder, which enables a non-specific location entered in the Address input to be almost instantly translated into latlong coordinates and mapped.

2. Media Upload: Popular online media management sites such as Flickr, YouTube, Picasa, and Vimeo provide image and video links for content owned by the user or deemed available for public use. Presently, GeoStories users must copy and paste the appropriate image or video link into the Pictures/Video input on the Story Board. They also have the option of including the embed codes of images and videos in the Description input.

3. Connecting The Dots: GeoStories does not present individual locations as separate entities of no (explicit) relation. Its Story Board interface allows for users to attach text and media to specific locations, and then connects those locations using numbered icons and lines, thereby guiding the reader to consider each location, or chapter, as part of a larger sustained narrative. Each chapter is also now represented as a button within the Table of Contents tab, allowing for additional navigation controls.

4. Google Places: Users can now search for different places of interest related to each individual chapter and its corresponding location, thereby enriching the narrative and providing GeoStories with additional functionality that widens its potential uses.

    Notable Challenges

1. Table of Contents Design: The coding necessary to automatically create buttons within the Table Of Contents tab each time a chapter is created was complex.

2. Google Places: Making the Google Places checkboxes and markers appear took much massaging; making them clear and reload each time a chapter changed was even more difficult. Learned a lot in the process…

3. Saving Stories: It seems we may not be able to implement this prior to final presentation…

    Future Improvements

1. Navigation Buttons Within InfoWindows.
2. Transition from Story Board to Table of Contents upon hitting the “Publish” button.
3. Additional introductory instructional videos.

Week_8_Final_Proposal_HLS

A. Final Proposal Topic, Description and Functionalities

How safe is LA? New IT firm to re-present the city’s safety in a new light

We are pleased to announce Home.Land.Security., a new IT firm specializing in mapping the safety of San Francisco’s communities for the city’s most vulnerable people.

In February of this year, Trayvon Martin, a 16-year-old African American was shot and killed by George Zimmerman as he walked to his girlfriend’s house in Sanford, Florida. The killing, which appears to have been racially motivated, has triggered anger and sadness nationwide. It has also sparked controversy and attention to the safety of Black and Latino teenagers—especially after talk show host Geraldo Rivera suggested that Trayvon’s death was due to his wardrobe choice (a hooded sweatshirt) rather than his racist attacker. This project is a response to incidents like Trayvon’s death, and seeks to bring to light the larger systemic forces that make neighborhoods unsafe and unhealthy.

In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the interrelationships between health, safety, and the built environment and the dire need to create safer spaces. Public health professionals have begun to think more holistically about health, questioning the social and spatial determinants of wellbeing. Planners too are thinking beyond their traditional domain, questioning how streets, housing, neighborhoods and cities may affect the health of their residents.

We believe that this growing attention to creating safe and healthy spaces is a positive development, but that it does not go far enough. It has failed to address the acute threats to the safety of queers, immigrants, people of color, women, low-income people, the homeless, people with disabilities, and other communities.

Home.Land.Security. seeks to fill this gap by visually representing unsafe, threatening and harmful spaces as experienced by the most vulnerable.

FUNCTIONALITIES (Note some of these features were added after the blog post deadline):

  1. Search Bar: The user can navigate the map by typing in an address or zip code.
  2. Officer Involved Shootings: The user will be able to toggle an officer involved shooting layer from 2000-2011, which will appear color coded by year. Each icon will have an info window that contains a description of the incident.
  3. Neighborhood Characterization: We compiled a layer of attributes including sums of demographics, crime counts and officer involved shooting counts to provide a characterization of each neighborhood. When the user clicks on a neighborhood (or searches for a neighborhood), a series of charts will pop up in the accordion style menu to show potential demographic and crime correlations with officer involved shootings

B. Updated Wireframe diagram

 

C. Current Development Status

  1. Here is the full site.
  2. In ArcMap we created an mxd layer with sums of demographic, crime and officer involved shooting data for each neighborhood in San Francisco, in preparation for making charts, using Google Charts API. We authored the layer in ArcGIS server and published the layer on our map
  3. We are cleaning up our code, removing the google places API and crimespotting API. We merged all of the OIS layers by year into one layer.
  4. We are adding a search bar for the user to search by location and modified the colors and layout of the site
  5. We began making demographic/crime statistics charts for each of the neighborhoods.

G. Challenges Issues

  • Making each neighborhood un-highlight whenever we click on another one
  • Formatting and presenting chart data
  • Presenting the most intuitive way to organize the buttons on the sidebar for our layers
  • Spiffing up the design
  • Figuring out why only 100-200 crimes show up from the crimespotting API when there should be 23,000

Education and Income Indices Around Metro Stops

Thanks to heightened interest in the site, we are able to bring you additional data. The metro stops will bring greater access to education and income, improving the overall quality of life for residents of Santa Fe.  The darker areas represent higher indices of access to education and income, depending on the toggled category.

A full version of the map is available here.

Tulum Raiders Week 7 Update

The Tulum Raiders have been hard at work, revisiting the drawing board to incorporate suggestions made by EY ventures in order to guarantee consumer satisfaction.

A More Focused Mission

The Tulum Neighborhood Portal will focus on assets, both existing and ideal, that will be mapped and rated by the Tulum community itself. Community events will continue to be actively updated via live Twitter feed with the hash tag, #eventosTulum

How will it Work

The Tulum Neighborhood Portal will contain three types of markers visitors can directly click, drag, and drop onto a map:

Red:                            Indicates an unsatisfactory area or asset that needs attention

Green:                        Indicates a positive asset in the community

Magic Wand:            Indicates a non-existing, but desired asset

The tool we will utilize to create the markers is Google Forms, and the mechanism (for now) we will be using to store the data so other users can see points already placed is Google Fusion Tables.

What Changes This Requires

First off, existing assets (such as bike paths, government offices, etc.) will no longer be toggled, but rather will serve as default items on the map. Under the new Tulum Raiders mapping plan, these points will have a “click” function that opens a Google form to rate the success of the point my indicating if its good or bad, green and red respectfully.

The Twitter feed will continue to inform site visitors about events, but will be linked to the more Tulum, Mexico specific hash tag #eventosTulum, and the widget box will play a more minor roll than the current Beta version reflects.

Why This Still Matters

The Tulum Neighborhood Portal will be a stress-free way to engage community members of Tulum in participatory planning. Tulum planners will have access to this visual and dynamic map that expresses the community’s desires and concerns. This will hopefully lead to more effective citizen oriented planning projects in the quickly growing community of Tulum.

 

Week 7 Assignment

This week I played with adding ArcGis layers into the proposed bus stop maps. After agonizing over the prospective layers I could add, I decided to include rail lines (excluding Expo line because I already had this shapefile from earlier this year) and libraries. Unfortunately neither rail nor libraries are very close to my area, so it’s not a very exciting map. Also, it seems that my existing bus stops are not being called.

Check it out for real here!