Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Proposed California High-Speed Rail Station Area Study?

This web-based mapping study presents profiles for six future California High Speed Rail Stations and their environs. Intending to provide California High Speed Rail stakeholders with key data related to station area urban form and morphology, RtH consultants compiled information related to poplation growth, land use, and the built environment for the proposed Anaheim, Norwalk, Los Angeles, Burbank, Sylmar, and Palmdale stations. Continue reading

CAHSR Station Area Study Site Launch!

Following significant research, client feedback, data collection, and intense coding preparation, Railway to Heaven is proud to launch its fully-functional interactive web map of 6 proposed California High Speed Rail Stations!

Please continue reading for more information about our project or click here to view our website. To preview a powerpoint of our site launch presentation please click here.

Project

Topic

Railway to Heaven seeks to buoy the California High Speed Rail Authority’s community outreach efforts through a new web-based interactive mapping tool. As one of the largest transportation infrastructure projects in recent memory, and the first potential high speed rail system in the United States, this project impacts communities at the local, regional, and state level. Planning for economic, population, and land use changes necessitate an understanding of the kinds of growth that may accompany high speed rail.

This project is particularly concerned with the proposed stations along the rail network, and the surrounding 1/2 mile station area. By examining a variety of land use, demographic, and built environment characteristics surrounding each station, we can better plan for station design that is appropriate to its surroundings, sustainable, and part of a cohesive network. As in many planning processes, information about the specifics of California’s high speed rail is difficult to access.  In place of lengthy, complicated planning documents RtH has conceptualized and constructed an interactive mapping website that synthesizes information and technology into a tool that helps the public understand high speed rail.

RtH’s website is geared toward stakeholders, community members, researchers, and planners with a vested interest in California’s plans for high speed rail. Given this broad audience, the site is designed for accessibility to a novice user while also providing a breadth of data for a more sophisticated user. Considering the potential long-term impact of high speed rail in California, it is important that local stakeholders have an opportunity to access information about HSR planning throughout the process. The constantly changing nature of planning for high speed rail also necessitates a web application with live data feeds, so that planners and researchers can draw on the most up-to-date information.

Description

The Proposed CAHSR Station Area Study website displays the proposed alignment for California’s High Speed Rail with detailed station area analyses for the six Phase 1 southern California cities: Anaheim, Norwalk, Los Angeles, Burbank, Sylmar/San Fernando and Palmdale.

Users can access information at two scales within the site: state and station-area. At the state level, visitors can examine the current proposed alignments for California’s High Speed Rail and see the location of the six Phase 1 stations along this route.

At the station area level, the map includes demographic growth projections from 2005 to 2035, land use data (presented by parcel and as percentages of the total station area), and a measure of site walkability provided by Walk Score. The station area analysis also incorporates features to assess proximate built environment characteristics and directions to the station via car, bicycle, or foot from any location inputted by the user.

Functionalities

The site provides information about HSR station areas to users through 6 tabbed pages, each with a map, accordion menu of features to display on the map, and links to FAQs and information about the project and design team. For each of these pages the map includes a marker at the center of the proposed station, an overlay of the station site, and a circle indicating the 1/2 mile station area.

The site also features an overview page (the first page of the site to load) with information about the project, a link to a video guide to the site (FAQ), a link to information about the RtH team, and an interactive map with the proposed HSR alignment and 6 southern California stations under study. When the user clicks on one of the stations they have access to a regional profile of that city, including data on median age, number of housing units, median family income, and average household size.

Figure 1: Overview page with regional profile, Los Angeles station

Following valuable input from advisors, clients, and users after our beta launch, the RtH team coordinated a massive overhaul of the site to launch it in its current form. We adopted a sleek, clean new design that incorporates accordion menus, background gradations, tabbed station area pages, and a color scheme corresponding with the HSR Authority’s official design. The new site sheds transit and housing APIs in order to incorporate more descriptive and interactive ArcGIS layers, pop-up charts, and GoogleMaps features like Street View and Get Directions.

Figure 2: New design features (radio tabs) and color scheme

For each station area the user can explore the built environment by dragging a GoogleMaps figure onto a desired location of the map. The street view then loads in the same window as the map (in very high resolution), allowing the user to toggle along the street and examine surrounding architecture and design elements. This feature is particularly beneficial to urban designers who are interested in the architecture, assets, and elements surrounding proposed stations.

Figure 3: Street view feature, Los Angeles station

The user can also investigate growth projections in the station area by census tract. If the checkbox for this layer is selected, a user may click on a track (or drag a green arrow to a tract) and open an infowindow. This infowindow contains a bar chart with data on population, household, and job growth projections for that tract from 2005 to 2035, by 15-year intervals. This feature is ideal for developers and businesses who may be interested in opportunities for housing or economic development around stations.

Figure 4: Bar chart with demographic projections by census tract, Los Angeles station

Additionally, the user can explore the land use, by parcel, for each station area by viewing a custom layer on the map (complete with a key describing the meaning of each color). Land use is also reflected as percentages of the station area in a pop-up pie chart (with detailed descriptions of surrounding land uses) accessible by clicking on a link in the sidebar. This data is especially valuable for planners and urban designers in conceptualizing station “type” and design.

Figure 5: Land use features (layer, pie chart, and legend), Los Angeles station

Users can assess how pedestrian friendly a station is by viewing a measure of walkability provided by Walk Score. A link adjacent to the score takes the user to Walk Score’s homepage and a detailed description of what each score means. This data might be helpful to planners in assessing possibilities for intermodal transit connections.

Figure 6: Walk Score feature, Los Angeles station

Lastly, users can learn how to travel to their desired HSR station by inputting their address (or a location of interest) and selecting a mode of travel (car, bike, or walk). The directions, travel time, and distance for the trip appear below their inquiry, and the map adjusts to display the suggested route. This feature is especially ideal for stakeholders who are interested in using high speed rail but are unsure of their distance or accessibility to a station.

Figure 7: Get Directions feature, Los Angeles station

 

Diagrams

Figure 8: Site Mock-Up

We generally adhered to the site layout, design, and content proposed in our scope of work and initial mock-up. We maintained formatting with station tabs at the top of the page, the map at right, and an accordion menu of features at left. We did however adjust the color scheme, condense housing, population, and employment data to a single Projections feature, and incorporated additional menu items such as Built Environment, Walk Score, and Get Directions.

 

Figure 9: Final wireframe

Our wireframe also has not changed drastically from our scope of work and original wireframe. We maintained a site structure in which the user enters the site through the “statewide” overview page and from there is able to select different station areas. Within the station area pages we adjusted the content and incorporated new features as previously mentioned. We also added links to the FAQ video, an About Us section, and this blog post.

 

Team

Dave Dixon
Technical Administrative Senior Engineering Roustabout (TASER)

Dave took on the mammoth task of authoring, manipulating, and publishing RtH’s ArcGIS layers with demographic projections and land use. He deftly mastered Google Charts and brought in a custom legend for the land use overlay. Dave also explored new code to insert bar charts into infowindows and incorporate pop-up pie charts with land use data and descriptions. Beyond these valuable efforts he also coded the street view feature.

Kimberly Williams
Project Management Mastermind

Kimberly explored new coding territory by contributing the WalkScore API and Get Directions features. She also provided several alterations to the HSR alignment KMZ. To evaluate the site’s effectiveness, Kimberly conducted several beta tests among users at a variety of technical skill levels. She synthesized their feedback to compile the content for the FAQ feature. Further Kimberly resumed her role as the team’s chief blogger.

Lars Carlson
Chief Creative Honcho

Lars is responsible for the new custom design and layout of RtH’s site. He created a custom J-Query theme, composed the site’s CSS, and explored a variety of new features from the API including radio tabs. Lars also provided invaluable troubleshooting assistance with the Get Directions feature and several layout issues. He offered innovative ideas, including the creation of a “video guide to the site” to sum up the FAQs. As a design aficionado Lars also authored RtH’s powerpoint presentation.

Evaluation

As with the beta version of this site, incorporating transit data proved to be a persistent difficulty. The lack of transit APIs beyond Metro and the inaccessibility of commute data for all station areas made incorporating this information untenable.

The team built on their mid-term experiences by collectively and carefully authoring code on separate pages within a single teammate’s account. This allowed for individual, but collaborative, work.

Despite our abilities to collaborate well as coders, distributing work proved to be a challenge because of the nature of our site. We attempted to address this issue by dividing up tasks and taking on new roles as needed.

In the future, we hope to build on the site by incorporating similar data for northern California proposed HSR stations. Likely the specific direction of the site will be determined by our clients’ needs and site evaluation.

Documentation

Interaction

-Get Directions

Custom Function

-WalkScore API
-Land Use Pie Chart Pop-Up
-Video FAQ
-JQuery radio buttons

Layers

-Projections (contains clickable element to display data in Google Charts)
-Land Use (contains a custom legend for design uniformity)

Help

-Video FAQ via WonderShare

Final Project Update, Week 8

On Track

With the midterm in our collective rearview window, we press on in the pursuit of the answer to that age-old question everyone asks at some point or another: how can a web-based mapping application communicate various levels of information to the proposed California high-speed rail project stakeholders?

For the midterm, we built a maproom that housed and visualized data profiles for two cities on the proposed HSR network–Los Angeles and Anaheim. Utilizing real-time API feeds in conjunction with native Google Maps API coding and Google Earth layer authoring, we incorporated built form photographs, existing transit stops, and current real estate data into our visualization of the half-mile area around these two future stations.

The final product (effectively the second phase of our project) fully develops six chosen station area profiles by including data generated on desktop ArcMap, including density, demographics, job market information, and land uses. These macro-level data allow stakeholders to quickly compare key statistics associated with station area urban form and morphology. If resources allow, the project will also include integration of public transit facilities and data–but only if the team deems the amount of data extant as sufficient for inclusion. As it was prior to the midterm, the unit of analysis is the half-mile HSR station area, but data communication is not limited to any scale.

Unlike the midterm, the final project will include future data projections as well as current conditions. Where the midterm acted as an urban-scale “snapshot” for visualizing conditions should the network be completed today, the final creates a backdrop for a discussion of how and why station areas will comparatively evolve when they plug into the regional HSR network.

Updated Wireframe and Mock-up

The midterm allowed us to get a better sense of what is within the realm of possibility for the final project. As such, we have revised our wireframes and mock-up to reflect our collective programming abilities.

Because each maproom will be a different URL, we can more easily place the links to each station page as buttons at the top. This leaves the sidebar to the left open for an accordian-style menu that will hold all the station-area data. Our mock-up demonstrates how this will roughly look, with various colors corresponding to the different functionalities of the site.

Our wireframe has also changed to show how each page will independently load the appropriate Google Earth-authored KMZ files and ArcMap authored layers (published via ArcServer). Within the accordian-style menus, it will be possible to toggle between current and future data.

Status

The project is currently in a regrouping phase as we shed the API elements of the midterm, which skim the surface of present-day station conditions, and begin implementing the high-level data processing capabilities that ArcMap integration provides.

As part of this phase of development, each member of the team has been delegated tasks that have to be completed before we move onto the re-authoring phase of the final project’s HTML and Javascript-based maproom. In addition to taking on current blogging duties, Lars is contributing this week’s updated wireframes and mock-ups, which demonstrate the current focus of the final project, and has begun researching CSS tab-style possibilities for organizing and presenting the final seven maprooms (one statewide plus six stations). Dave and Kimberly currently are organizing recently obtained raw data and shapefiles containing housing, population, employment, and land use information for our six stations. Once these files have been finalized in ArcMap form, the team will begin bringing them into our final maproom in the coming weeks.

Challenges/Issues

Right now, the team has encountered a few challenges, although none of them are insurmountable. Because team members have had little to no prior HTML or CSS coding experience, presenting Google Maps API-based maprooms in a professional format has been a task throughout the quarter. However, with the introduction of jQueri UI in this week’s class, integrating flashy-looking menus and tabs into the interface has become significantly easier.

Another anticipated issue is going to be Lars’s distance from the HSR project with which Kimberly and Dave have and continue to be thoroughly involved in. Hopefully the team can come up with a way to spread the workload so that Dave and Kimberly do not have to do all of the data-based map layer authoring.

The final foreseeable issue involves the integration of transit information. The midterm demonstrated that Metro’s API may be the only public transit API available, so the group will have to weigh the costs and benefits of only integrating Metro-API transit areas, hardcoding transit stops outside Metro’s service area, or dropping transit from the project altogether.

Announcing a California High Speed Rail Station Area Mapping Tool! (Beta Version)

Railway to Heaven Announces the Beta Launch of its new website!

Topic, Description, and Functionalities

Railway to Heaven seeks to buoy the California High Speed Rail Authority’s community outreach efforts through a new web-based interactive mapping tool. The Proposed CAHSR Station Area Study website displays the proposed alignment for California’s High Speed Rail with detailed station area analyses for Los Angeles and Anaheim. At the station area level, this tool displays data on proposed station location, transit intermodality, proximate built environment characteristics, and housing affordability.

Users can access information at two scales within the site: state and station-area level. At the state level, visitors can examine the current proposed alignments for California’s High Speed Rail and see the location of Los Angeles and Anaheim’s stations along this route. In addition to basic Google Maps zoom features, this map includes pop-up infowindows identifying each leg of the alignment. These windows are activated by clicking on a section of the proposed alignment.

Statewide map featuring alignment information and station area study sites

At the station-area level users can display live data from Zillow, Flickr, and Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority in addition to published data from the High Speed Rail Authority and Orange County Transportation Authority. The Los Angeles station area page allows users to toggle each of these features on and off, including toggling between 20 different bus lines that connect to the proposed station area. The user is also able to display layers featuring the proposed station site, half mile station area, and proposed alignment. The left side bar loads with housing information for the zip code containing the station area, although the user can conveniently call housing data for other areas by entering the desired zip code in a search box and selecting “Go”.

Los Angeles station area map with all features enabled

The proposed station area page for Anaheim features all of the functionalities for Los Angeles as listed above, with a minor difference in the display of transit intermodality. Due to the unavailability of a transit API for Orange County, bus stops are hard-coded into the site and appear on the map when it is loaded. The transit functionality cannot be toggled off, and only displays stops from bus lines within a five mile radius of Anaheim’s proposed ARTIC station.

Anaheim station area map with all features enabled

Audience, Strategies, and Implementation

RtH’s website is geared toward stakeholders, community members, researchers, and planners with a vested interest in California’s plans for high speed rail. Given this broad audience, the site is designed for accessibility to a novice user while also providing a breadth of data for a more sophisticated user. Considering the potential long-term impact of high speed rail in California, it is important that local stakeholders have an opportunity to access information about HSR planning throughout the process. The constantly changing nature of planning for high speed rail also necessitates a web application with live data feeds, so that planners and researchers can draw on the most up-to-date information.

The RtH design team prioritized user accessibility by concentrating data in the left sidebar, featuring simple toggle checkboxes to control data representation, and employing a clean, uncluttered interface. Above all, the team strove to allow users optimal control over data visualization by avoiding “hard coding” where possible.

In an effort to supply users with a broad range of data, RtH incorporated three APIs and layers created from High Speed Rail Authority documents. Potential high speed rail travelers can examine ways of getting around on public transit from the proposed station site. Planners and designers can examine existing built environment characteristics and architectural details through Flickr photographs. Current residents and future residents can consider home prices near each station as well.

By featuring the current station areas for Los Angeles and Anaheim, the site also allows for a comparative examination of similar data across cities. For example, the user will notice the high density of transit intermodality surrounding the proposed station in Los Angeles when compared to Anaheim. Ideally this comparative feature will enable both planners and local stakeholders to conceive of station design, construction, and planning as activities woven within a broad, inter-city network.

Diagrams, sketches, wireframes

Wireframe for beta-version of website

Wireframe for final version of website

Team Roles

Dave Dixon
Technical Administrative Senior Engineering Roustabout (TASER)

As the team’s TASER, Dave took on the task of conquering the numerous technological challenges the team confronted. Focusing primarily on programming research and implementation, Dave provided the foundation Javascript, HTML, and CSS documents from which the team worked throughout the project. He was also in charge of researching new functionalities needed for RtH’s main application, including the integration of the HTML and Javascript zoom feature, various toggling components, and Google Earth .kmz displays for proposed station areas.

Kimberly Williams
Project Management Mastermind

At the project’s start, Kimberly took on the tireless task of authoring the proposed route of the California High Speed Rail system in its entirety. Undaunted by the monumentality of that task, she then moved on to serve as author of various site functionalities, including station radius buffers and Zillow API integration. She continues to offer her cyber penmanship as the team’s head blogger.

Lars Carlson
Chief Creative Honcho

Lars provided the team with initial creative direction, site mock-ups, and project vision at the outset. While some components of the initial mock-ups proved unfeasible given the group’s collective programming skill, the group will continue to research means to implement items such as graphical buttons/toggles and separate data visualization frames/divs. Following the brainstorming phase, Lars worked on developing the site’s masthead and contributed to various .css tweaks that affected the overall look of the site. He also worked on implementing the Built Environment layer, which is based on the Flickr API and looked into .kmz integration opportunities for Anaheim transit.

Project Challenges

The project was and continues to be an immense challenge, both organizationally and technically. Our primary concern involved management of coding files; we made version control of paramount importance throughout the coding process so that integration of multiple files and painstaking cut-and-paste were kept to a minimum.

Successful file management depended on two important factors. First, there was communication. When a team member was working on “live” files, we placed utmost importance on communicating to other team members what we were working on and for how long. If another file had to be created due to two people working on the main code at once, we were sure to communicate how those two pieces of code would be integrated later down the line. Second, Dave took the initiative to research and implement a .css style sheet in its own file, separated from the Javascript and html code. This proved immensely helpful; while Dave was working on implementing a .kmz layer, for instance, Lars was able to simultaneously edit div size, text color, and so forth.

While we had great success in managing our files, we were not as successful in implementing some of the original layout ideas for placement of buttons and information frames. Mostly, this was due to our lack of experience working with .css and Javascript. As avid web browsers, we have seen the ability to implement graphical button toggles (as opposed to simple checkbox toggles) on numerous websites; however, we have not been able to get these items to be fully functional on our site. For an early version of the site, Dave coded button divs at the top of the page, but we ultimately couldn’t get the functionality we wanted from them, so we opted to take them out. Therefore, all map layers are now included in the left side div, with location zoom links separated by their own div at the top. We hope to move the API and .kmz layers out of the side div and back up top eventually, and move information (such as that called from Zillow) into its own information div somewhere else on the page.

Finally, we only managed to implement the Zillow API as it was included in the class tutorial—through a search format as opposed to an automatic call for the information based on the placement of rail station marker. We are looking into ways to realize Zillow in a format that is more suited to our station-based site. As it is, the ability of the user to input a zip code is a bit awkward.

Future Directions and Proposed Modifications

The final application will include a finer detail of demographic, employment, land use and transportation data. The application will include land use overlays, parcel subdivision tables, and employment and activity centers within the half-mile station area. Commuting data by transportation analysis zone, local job sector breakdown, and employment, population and housing projections will be mapped for five-mile station ridersheds. We will create these data using desktop ArcMap and MS Excel, and will import shapefiles using ESRI’s ArcServer.

Land use will be displayed as a transparent overlay using the conventional APA land based color classification system. Employment and activity centers (e.g. major retail centers, airports or top employers) will be point-based attributes with custom symbols. All data organized in tables will be displayed with on-click infowindows or toggle switches.

We will improve the user interface by customizing new DIV’s and pop up windows for clicked elements. Currently, the midterm project has little need for pop ups, as most data is displayed upon page load through APIs, then toggled on or off. As we add data, however, it must be organized to not display all at once, so as not to overwhelm the user. Enhanced data and page navigation is another goal. Hyperlinks to external websites and click-linked text will make data flow and wayfinding more intuitive.

 

Beta Launch Update

This week, Railway to Heaven has entered into diversified production mode in preparation for its beta website launch next week. Following research and group discussion the team has decided to alter its website proposal slightly. Instead of examining a single route between Los Angeles and the Bay Area, the website will showcase built environment, transportation, and housing data for the HSR route connecting Los Angeles and Anaheim.

The RtH team undertook three tasks this week. The Chief Creative Honcho applied his aesthetic acumen to researching cascading style sheets and identifying attractive, user friendly designs that will best structure RtH’s website and represent its work. RtH’s resident TASER undertook the task of creating a generic maproom that will serve as the foundation of the team’s new site. As a final piece of the group’s preparatory activities, the PMM created a .kmz file with the proposed HSR alignments throughout California, including latitude and longitude points for all stations. The team anticipates final formatting activities and addition of 3 APIs to take place this week.

Announcing Railway to Heaven’s New Web Application!

Project Description

With this project we aim to answer the following question: how can a web-based mapping application communicate various levels of information to the proposed California high-speed rail project stakeholders? The unit of analysis is the halfmile HSR station area, but data communication is not limited to any scale.

We propose to develop the application in two phases. First, for the midterm, we will build a maproom that uses various data to create profiles for two cities on one leg of the HSR network – Los Angeles to San Jose, for example. Users can navigate from the state to city-level, gathering large-scale data such as built form character, existing transit connectivity/intermodality, the existing real estate and housing market, and the location of economic or activity centers. Essentially, the application uses real-time API data to become an online asset map.

The second phase for the final exam fully develops all station area profiles by including data generated on desktop ArcMap, including density, demographics, job market information, commute patterns and land uses. These macro-level data allow stakeholders to quickly compare key statistics associated with station area urban form and morphology. Where the first part acts as an urban scale “snapshot” for visualizing conditions should the network be completed today, the second creates a backdrop for a discussion of how and why station areas will comparatively evolve when they plug into the regional HSR network.

Site Functionalities

a. Incorporate APIs to show current conditions related to housing market (Zillow), built environment (Flickr), transit (Metro), and possibly others. This is subject to change as APIs allow.
b. Zoom function that lets the user change the scale — from a view of the entire system all the way up to a 1/2 mile station area.
c. A possible data window that shows data related to the current map view (housing prices for all listings in that area, for instance; or a total count of the number of snapshots in that window). This may be the most difficult thing to do, since we have not yet done any actually analysis of API data.
d. Link to blog with information about the project.

Wireframes

Phase 1 (Midterm) Wireframe

Phase 2 (Final) Wireframe

 

The Phase 1 wireframe essentially outlines the general layout and framework of RtH’s web application. This includes the relevant APIs and the possibility of including detailed info windows and/or summary and data analysis.

The Phase 2 wireframe builds upon the basic layout in Phase 1, incorporating additional data layers from ArcGIS. The RtH team also hopes to build in data windows that display pertinent housing, built environment, transit, and employment data when selected by the user.

Diagram

Web Application Mock-up

Railway to Heaven proposes a website that is clean, sophisticated, and user-friendly. There will be a sidebar with links to each proposed high speed rail station. Clicking the link will enable the application to zoom to that station, from which the user will be able to click on a variety of map icons related to housing, built-form, and transit characteristics.

There will be bar above the map isolating characteristics for each of the topics under study. This will allow users to search both by station or by desired information category.

 

Datasets

  1. Zillow API (housing data)
  2. Flickr API (built form characteristics)
  3. Metro API (transit intermodality)
  4. San Francisco Blue and Gold Fleet, http://www.blueandgoldfleet.com/ (transit intermodality)
  5. Employment data (Dataset compiled by HSR Team)

Milestones

Week 4: Create maproom, style website, add Metro API and Northern California API with transit data

Week 5: Add Zillow API and Flickr API

Week 6: Prepare presentation and launch beta version of website

Weeks 7-8: Finalize ArcGIS map layers with employment data

Weeks 9-10: Devise sophisticated data display options

Finals Week: Prepare presentation and launch final version of website

Introducing Railway to Heaven

Railway to Heaven is a collaborative of designers investigating the station areas along California’s proposed high speed rail system. Working in collaboration with SCAG and CalTrans, RtH will produce an interactive web-based map featuring the station locations and alignments for California’s high speed rail. Conceived as a tool for planners, regional officials, and the general public, the website will allow users to “travel the rail” and visualize an extensive transit network prior to its creation. RtH proposes an interactive map that provides information on community characteristics surrounding each station, such as housing affordability, transportation/commuting statistics, income levels, and proximate places of interest.  

Meet the Team

Lars Carlson
Chief Creative Honcho

Lars brings years of editing and print publishing experience to RtH, where he contributes to the team’s constantly growing library of code and provides creative and technical direction. When not learning new computer coding languages or attempting to locate missing squiggly brackets, Lars enjoys surfing and biking in his native Venice, California. He holds a BA in History from UCLA.

Dave Dixon
Technical Administrative Senior Engineering Roustabout (TASER)

 As a second year urban planning student, Dave has been investigating California’s high speed rail proposals for nearly a year.

 

 

 Kimberly Williams
Project Management Mastermind

An alumnus of UCLA with a BA in Art History, Kimberly has evolved from her artistic roots to pursue masters degrees in Urban and Regional Planning and Latin American Studies. As the PMM she offers logistical savvy and nuanced data analysis to RtH’s projects. Beyond her cartographic pursuits Kimberly can usually be found exploring public art in Los Angeles or practicing her ochos at the Oxygen Tango School.